Make your own free website on Tripod.com

THE WEEKLY POST

ADVERTISING

HOME
ABOUT US
EDITORIAL
NATIONAL
WORLD NEWS
EVENTS
CAREERS
OPINION
ADVERTISING
PUBLIC INFO
COMMUNITY RELATIONS
ARCHIVES
CONTACT US

“Help Fight Against Illegal Traffic In Forestry And Wildlife Products At Local Level”

-          Forestry And Wildlife Minister Prof. Ngole Ngole Tells Cameroonians

 

The Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife is one of those national structures which institutional activities affect the daily lives of all Cameroonians either within the forestry or wildlife sectors or both. In this strategic position, all actions or decisions taken by officialdom affect ordinary Cameroonians in one way or the other. Which is why this ministry must always strive to involve Cameroonians in all its activities. This is exactly what Prof. Elvis Ngole Ngole has been doing since arriving at that ministry – getting Cameroonians to play a more proactive role in the management of national forestry and wildlife resources.

 

To get Cameroonians totally involved in combating the ills that this ministry is faced with, principally illegal trade in forestry and wildlife products, the ministry has been sensitising the public on its role in these national challenges.

 

With the permanent rapidly evolving local and international situation as concerns the forestry and wildlife sectors, the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife is obliged to always be on its toes combating various local and international cartels which have always been on the move, crafting new ways of circumventing national as well as international laws and protocols.

 

The ultimate goal of all these actions is to improve on the livings standards of Cameroonians by creating an enabling environment that would alleviate poverty and bring peace, prosperity and happiness to the Cameroonian people.

 

Getting Cameroonians, especially the rural populations involved not only in fighting the ills enumerated, but also in the activities within the ambit of the ministry’s portfolio also involves informing them on how to go about soliciting services and obtaining various official documents from that ministry.

 

In the write-ups that follow, the WEEKLY POST brings to you the various actions undertaken and being undertaken to fulfil President Biya’s great ambitions in the forestry and wildlife sectors as well as the various actions put in place to ensure rapid and satisfactory services to the public in the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife.

 

This survey was investigated and written by Chief Bisong Etahoben and Eric Kombey Wolete with the technical and professional assistance of the Communication Unit of the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife headed by Mr. Jean Robert Onana.

 

Ministry Of Forestry And Wildlife: Fighting Unemployment And Alleviating Poverty

 

By Chief Bisong Etahoben in Yaounde

 

The recent global economic downturn has left in its wake, not only bad memories and wounded financial establishments and projections, but also had a positive aspect to it, namely lessons learnt by national governments on how to cushion such economic shocks in future. One such lesson learnt by the Cameroonian government involves the wood sector that saw a shortfall of about 60% in its activities during the 2009 fiscal year.

 

According to the Minister of Forestry and Wildlife, Professor Elvis Ngole Ngole in his budget presentation to the National Assembly on November 24, 2009, “…thousands of jobs have been lost, while several factories closed and serious losses in terms of government earnings are the main headlines of the year 2009. The magnitude of the damages and their collateral impacts has prompted the government to take a number of courageous measures. Through its decision to act collectively, coupled with efforts made at the global level to overcome the economic shock, the government has reacted appropriately as attested to by the results attained today.

 

“The precarious nature of this recovery however requires both caution and audacity. It is on these grounds that the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife has, on the high instructions of the Prime Minister and Head of Government, designed a number of scenarios for the future in order to enable us to increase our capacity to anticipate … future events and prevent shocks. Broadly speaking, emphasis will be laid on timber processing/transforming activity by training local actors and acquiring the appropriate equipment so that this option ceases to be a mere slogan.

 

“This new approach equally entails seeking new markets and maximising the use of logged timber, as only 35% of the value of a felled tree is effectively exploited. The rest of it is abandoned in the bush.

 

“It is our conviction that the forestry sector can boost economic growth in Cameroon if all the opportunities it offers are capitalised on. The international financial crisis has come to remind us of a reality we now know about, notably that the current structure of our economy makes it fall prey to the least shock that affects the international market. The concerted approach adopted by the government vis--vis this situation confirms that future solutions will be collective. In order to achieve the desired level of timber processing, the MINFOF customs the same actors who came to the rescue of the forestry sector in 2009, will again be called upon to take action.”

 

The minister revealed that a draft plan for the industrialisation and transformation of wood is in the process of being elaborated.

 

One of the main actors in the domain of transforming and processing Cameroonian timber would be the Centre for the Promotion of Wood (Centre de Promotion du Bois – CPB) currently based in Nkolbison, Yaounde. To enable it to fully execute its assigned missions, the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife, according to Minister Ngole Ngole has signed a partnership convention with an international non-governmental organisation PRYME PARTNER with a view to adding value to wood through training and development of the second and third transformation levels of wood.

 

The minister has revealed that a tender has been launched for the equipment and rehabilitation of the CPB adding that renovation work at the centre is going on as well as the study of the dossiers of the personnel with a view to clarifying their situation.

 

Established in 1970 by government with assistance from the United Nations through the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) – because at the time, anything concerning the forestry sector was associated to agriculture, according to the current Director of the Centre Mr. Lefang Paul, a wood engineer – the centre started receiving assistance from the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) in 1988 by sending experts to put in place the necessary infrastructure.

 

Since its creation, the CPB has been under the umbrella of various ministries including the Ministry of Plan and Regional Development, the Ministry of Agriculture and eventually the Ministry of Environment and Forestry which was split into the Ministries of Forestry and Wildlife and the Ministry of Environment and Nature Protection. Today the Centre is attached to the services of the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife.

 

Speaking to the WEEKLY POST in his office near the police station in Nkolbison January 12, 2010, Mr. Lefang revealed that since its inception, the CPB has trained over one hundred Cameroonians on woodwork, adding that those trained at the centre are wood technicians who come to register in order to be perfected in the various aspects of wood transformation.

 

He revealed that the CPB has two principal missions namely the promotion of lesser known species of timber in Cameroon and the training of Cameroonians on woodwork/transformation.

 

The Director said Cameroon has over three hundred species of wood but only about fifteen species are known by Cameroonians and generally used by them.

 

His most immediate needs now include equipment for the centre, as according to him, the equipment that is currently in the centre dates back to over thirty-five years. He said the modern equipment the centre now needs would cost over four hundred million (400.000.000) FCFA.

 

The Director revealed that it is thanks to the centre that most Cameroonians now know that they must only use dry wood in all their household objects and in building.

 

As to whether the centre has the necessary manpower to accomplish its missions, the Director said there is a pool of qualified personnel inherited from the defunct National Office for Forestry Development (ONADEF) and the National Centre for Forestry Development (CENADEF). But he said the personnel available were not enough as the centre still needs to reinforce its capacity both qualitatively and quantitatively in order to thoroughly accomplish its assigned missions.

 

Asked what his immediate preoccupation concerning the centre was, Mr. Lefang said he would want that the necessary personnel be put in place and that the centre begins functioning in full swing. He would also want that a meeting of the centre’s management committee be convened.

 

What Is The Forest Environment Sectoral Programme – FESP?

 

The Forest Environment Sectoral Programme popularly known by its French spelling (PSFE) constitutes a reference framework of the activities carried out in the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife. It is equally a new integrated approach as regards the concept of sustainable development, and a reference framework for the conservation, sustainable management and exploitation of forests. Moreover, it is a conceptual framework for halting the fragmentation efforts made to ensure that forests in Cameroon are managed in a sustainable manner. This multi-actors and multi-partners programme has the vocation to combine all sector-based initiatives and ensure that they are coherent.

BASIC FESP PRINCIPLES   

1. National sovereignty and leadership for Cameroon;

2. Compliance with the institutional and legal frameworks in Cameroon; and

3. Compliance with the agreements and other international commitments taken by our country.

Objectives of the FESP:

Strategic Objectives: Allowing/making it possible for the government to:

Identify its priority needs in terms of the implementation of both its forestry and environmental policies;

Better focus/mainstream its national efforts, and foreign assistance towards priority objectives for the development of both the forestry and environmental sectors;

Build the capacity of both the Central and External Services of MINFOF and MINEP, as well as those of other bodies and structures under their authority;

Render the sustainable management of forest as well as ecological resources effective; and

Associate and involve all the stakeholders in the management of forest and ecological resources.

Overall Objectives: Guarantee the conservation as well as the sustainable management and exploitation of the forest ecosystems, so as to be able to meet local, national, regional and global needs of both present and future generations.

Development-related Objectives: Improve on the living conditions of the neighbouring populations through the management of the forest ecosystems.

Programme Objectives: Ensure the longevity of the economical, ecological as well as social functions of all the forest ecosystems in Cameroon, through the sustainable   management of forest and wildlife resources therein.

 

Forestry Resources As Principal Contributor To The National Budget

 

By Chief Bisong Etahoben in Yaounde

 

Never before in the fifty-year history of independent Cameroon has so much been put in place towards the viable and sustainable management of our forest resources as what is being done now by way of investment in manpower, resources and finances by the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife, led by Prof. Elvis Ngole Ngole who is also the National Coordinator of the Forest Environment Sectoral Programme popularly known by its French abbreviation PSFE.

 

PRINCIPAL OBJECTIVES OF THE MINISTRY OF FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE

In fact, the principal objective of the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife is to put in place Cameroon’s forestry policy couched on four principal pillars namely, the durable management of national forests, the conservation of its biodiversity, the participation of the local populations and the improvement of governance.

This policy, according to Prof. Ngole Ngole in a presentation to the National Assembly on November 24, 2009, which was launched in 2004 through the Forest Environment Sectoral Programme is the context within which partners in the forestry and wildlife sector interact. It also aims, in the short term, at the institutionalisation of the economic, ecological and social functions of the entire forestry ecosystems of Cameroon through the durable management of forestry and wildlife resources.

 

FINANCIAL DISPENSATION

In this regard, government has been steadily increasing its activities towards the realisation of these objectives. Thus, during the 2009 fiscal year, government placed at the disposal of the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife, the sum of 20.778 million FCFA broken down as follows:

Running costs – 10.893 million FCFA which was spent on:

-          Permanent expenditure on personnel – 4.485 million FCFA

-          Other expenses on personnel – 183 million FCFA

-          Scholarships and refresher courses – 174 million FCFA

-          Other goods and services – 5.107 million FCFA

-          Goods and services on C2D – 444 million FCFA

-          Highly-indebted poor country (HIPC) goods and services – 500 million FCFA

Expenditure on investment came up to 9.885 FCFA which was spent on:

-          Investment on ordinary internal resources – 5.000 million FCFA

-          HIPC investment – 1.000 million FCFA

-          C2D investment – 3.885 million FCFA.

 

Two billion FCFA also went to the Special Fund for Forestry Development and 250 million FCFA to the Special Fund for Wildlife and Nature Protection.

With all this money put at its disposal, the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife was in 2009 able to start the procedure on the revision of the forestry law which would take care of the shortcomings in its application encountered on the field after fifteen years.

 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST MANAGEMENT UNITS

The ministry also finalised and forwarded the procedure of the classification of 34 forest management units (FMU), thus increasing the classified surface area from four million to about 5.5 million hectares, the beginning and completion of the classification of three other forestry units as well as the continuation of the durable management of forests by the validation of eight management plans of FMU and a management plan for one communal forest which brings to 72, the number of productive forests under management out of 113 identified. During the last fiscal year, of the 69 forest lots up for grabs, 60 were attributed to exploiters and this contributes substantially to the national budget.

 

THE FORESTRY SECTOR’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT

During the 2009 fiscal year, the forestry sector pumped in 327 billion FCFA to the gross domestic product (GDP). Of this amount, 5.5 billions FCFA came in from forestry exploitation, 45 billion FCFA from timber transportation, 150 billion FCFA from industries, goods and buildings, 15 billion FCFA from energy consumption (electricity and fuel), 20 billion FCFA by way of salaries, national social insurance dues and insurance, 22 billion FCFA in direct taxes and 28 billion FCFA by way of port handling charges.

 

COMMUNITY FORESTS

As concerns communal forests, twelve new applications were received and two provisional conventions signed for forest reserves in 2009, five management conventions were signed, 17 annual certificates of exploitation delivered in 2008 were extended by two months, 59 annual exploitation certificates were delivered.

A new manual aimed at simplifying the procedure for the obtention of community forest authorisations was adopted in February 2009 according to the proposals made by the various actors involved in the domain.

 

FOREST REGENERATION BY PLANTING OF TREES

The objective of the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife as concerns re-aforestation in 2009 was to plant three million tress. Through sensitisation and concerted efforts with various communities and actors within the national polity, 2.225.167 trees were planted giving a success rate of 74%. Civil society, notably non-governmental organisations, network of parliamentarians and individuals planted a total of 1.420.964 trees.

The various councils participated actively in the tree-planting exercise and contributed about 31% to the success of the exercise while forestry exploiters contributed 5% to the effort.

Concerning applications for collaboration agreements from councils, of the thirty received, twelve have already been signed with councils in the West and Northwest regions for the re-aforestation in the Bamboutos mountains and in the Far North region for the re-aforestation of the Lake Chad area which has been hard hit by desertification. Two conventions have been renewed with two non-governmental organisations namely Global Action for Sustainable Development (GASD) in the South region and Garoua Arbre de Vie in the Far North region.

All in all, with all these visible efforts being put in by the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife under the leadership of Prof. Elvis Ngole Ngole, there is every reason to strongly hold that Cameroon’s leadership in forestry governance within the Central African sub region would continue and even be further strengthened.

New Ministerial Decision On Bush Meat: Allaying Local Concerns And Protecting Endangered Species

 

By Chief Bisong Etahoben in Yaounde

 

Even before the establishment of the Ministry of Environment and Forestry which was later split into the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife and the Ministry of Environment and Nature Protection, there had been a running argument over the place of the human being within the context of the armada of animal protection legislation in force in the country.

 

With an ever-increasing list of protected species of animals, which hitherto were a source of livelihood to most rural Cameroonians, the general feeling was that the interest of the Cameroonian human was being neglected on the alter of the protection of animal species.

Something had to be done in order to allay the fears of the rural populations, some of whose main source of livelihood was hunting, as well as the urban populations to whom bush meat was a delicacy.

 

Over the years, a vibrant trade in bush meat has developed whereby middlemen buy the meat in large quantities from rural areas where hunting is a profession to some individuals and sell it to eating houses, hotels and individual households in urban centres.

 

The problem with this arrangement was that it encouraged the large scale slaughter of all species of animals including even those partially or completely protected by national and international laws and treaties without distinction.

 

It should be noted however that government has always insisted that the consumption of bush meat was not prohibited. In fact in a recent letter of the Minister of Forestry and Wildlife, Prof. Elvis Ngole Ngole to Cameroonians, he insisted, and we quote:

 

“Consuming bush meat and forestry exploitation are not prohibited. But activities within the forestry and wildlife sectors are regulated by laws in force. These laws which were passed by the National Assembly are binding on all of us. They fall within the context of durable management.”

 

Within the context of this durable management, permits are obligatory before hunting certain species of animals which are classified in three classes: A, B and C.

 

Class A comprises rare species or species threatened with extinction. As such, they are totally protected and it is forbidden to kill them. However, any person who wishes to capture or keep them for management purposes or within the framework of scientific research or for reasons of protection of persons and their property, must obtain a special authorization issued by the services in charge of wildlife.

 

CLASS A MAMMALS

The species belonging to this class are as follows: Leopard, cheetah, hunting leopard, African caracal, Asian caracal, caracal, desert lynx, wild dog, gorilla, chimpanzee, drill, mandrill, eastern black-and-white colobus, magistrate colobus, guereza, Preuss’s guenon, Preuss’s monkey, Hoest’s monkey, mountain monkey, angwantibo, golden potto, Bosman’s potto, potto, potto gibbon, Allen’s bushbaby, Allen’s galago, Allen’s squirrel galago, aardvark, antbear, giant ground pangolin, giant pangolin, African manatee, West African manatee, Beecroft’s flying squirrel, Beecroft’s scaly-tailed squirrel, African elephant, African savannah elephant (with tusk of less than 5 kilogrammes), black rhinoceros, brose rhinoceros, hook-lipped rhinoceros, giraffe (seahorse), gazelle (red-fronted gazelle), mountain reedbuck, water chevrotain.

 

CLASS A BIRDS

Birds within this Class A are: ostrich, bateleur, bateleur eagle, Japanese white stork, oriental stork, oriental white stork, black stork, American flamingo, Caribbean flamingo, greater flamingo, Mount Cameroon patridge, large-stripped “cobe-mouches”, black crowned-crane, West African crowned crane, crested ibis, saddlebill stork, secretary bird, ring-necked parakeet, rose-ringed parakeet, red-faced lovebird, red-headed lovebird, Senegal parrot, Jardine’s parrot, red-crowned parrot, red-fronted parrot, Mount Kupe shrike, butcherbird, bare-headed rockfowl, white-necked picathartes, white-necked rockfowl, yellow-headed rockfowl, grey-headed green shrike, white-necked timalie, Maxwell’s black weaver, white-naped weaver, green turaco, bannerman’s turaco.

 

CLASS A REPTILES

Reptiles in Class A are: African sharp-nosed crocodile, African slender-snouted crocodile, long-snouted crocodile, African crocodile, Nile crocodile, African dwarf crocodile, West African dwarf crocodile, marine turtles, Indian bullfrog, tiger frog.

Animals in Class B comprise species that benefit from partial protection, and which can only be hunted, captured or killed by obtaining a wildlife exploitation title or licence.

Species of Class B are made of the following:

 

MAMMALS

Mammals in Class B are: giant eland, bongo, buffalo, hippopotamus, large hippo, roan antelope (giant sable), topi, tsessebe, tsessebi, korrigum, hartebeest, African elephant (with tusk of more than 5 kilos),marshbuck, sitatunga, cob, defassa, waterbuck, bushbuck, giant forest hog, African wildpig, wart hog, African civet, yellow-backed duiker, black-stripped duiker, bay duiker, banded duiker, zebra antelope, zebra duiker, Peter’s duiker,  spotted hyaena.

 

BIRDS

Birds in Class B are: martial eagle, steppe eagle, tawny eagle, great egret, great white egret, ducks, marabou stork, Denham’s bustard, Stanley bustard, grey (red-tailed) parrot, Senegal bustard, white-bellied bustard, white-bellied kornhaan, black-tip crested turaco, crested turaco, verreaux’s turaco, yellow-billed turaco, white-crested turaco, violet plantain-eater, violet turaco, blue plantain-eater, great blue turaco.

 

CLASS B REPTILES

Reptiles in Class B are: African python, African rock python, Chinese cobra, Chinese spitting cobra, African small-grain lizard, Nile monitor, agra lizard, agra monitor, Baghdad small-grain lizard, desert monitor, grey monitor.

 

CLASS C MAMMALS

Animals in Class C comprise species other than those of classes A and B. These class C species are partially protected; their capture and killing are regulated in order to maintain the dynamics of their populations.

 

MINISTERIAL ACTION TO SATISFY NATIONAL POPULATION

To kill two birds with one stone, (i.e. create an environment where animal life and especially protected species can continue to thrive while humans especially those whose livelihood depends on hunting and trade in bush meat) the Minister of Forestry and Wildlife, Prof. Elvis Ngole Ngole signed Decision N000857/D/MINFOF of November 10, 2009 organising commerce in bush meat.

 

According to the decision, commerce in bush meat would henceforth be carried out only by holders of licences delivered by the relevant wildlife authorities.

 

Article Two of the decision stipulates that commerce in bush meat would henceforth be carried out only in designated areas created to this effect by Government Delegates and Mayors of Councils. The sale of bush meat outside the said designated areas is strictly prohibited especially along highways, train stations, motor parks, airports and seaports.

 

Article Three provides that valid licence holders are authorised to sell but dead animals in Class C. However, the sale of Class A and B species can only be done if the carcasses come from holders of valid hunting licences, the competent authorities within the context of administrative weeding or a public auction sale.

 

The minister in charge of wildlife would decide on the list of authorised species to be sold in the specially designated areas decided upon each year.

 

The decision further stipulates that besides commercial transactions authorised by administrative weeding and public auctions within the ambit of the dispositions of the law, all other commerce in bush meat is prohibited during the period of the closure of the hunting season.

 

The competent structures of the Ministries in charge of Wildlife, Animal Breeding, Public Health, Justice and Territorial Administration and Decentralisation as well as Government Delegates, Mayors of Council are charged with the execution of the said decision.

Contravention of the decision would be punished according to the regulations in force.

 

Our Obligations Towards The Cameroonian People

 

OUR MISSIONS

- Ensure the management and protection of the forests within the national territory;

- Develop and supervise national forests regeneration, reforestation, as well as inventory and management programmes;

- Ensure that the forestry and wildlife legislation is enforced, and that administrative sanctions are taken and applied where need be;

- Ensure the creation and management of protected areas;

- Ensure the implementation and subsequent follow up of all wildlife-related international conventions ratified by Cameroon; and

- Ensure the supervision of the National Forestry Development Authority (ANAFOR), the Mbalmayo National Forestry School (ENEF) and the Garoua-based School of Wildlife (EFG), and the coordination of the activities with development partners in the forestry sector.  

 

OUR VISION

Ensure that the development of the Forest Environment Sectoral Programme (FESP) develops as a reference framework of forest-related activities, through efficient coordination of the latter resulting from a permanent consultation between the Forestry Administration and all the partners involved in sector-based development.

 

OUR WORKING PARTNERS

In the Public Sector:

ANAFOR, PAFRA, PSRF.

In the Private Sector:

- The National Trade Union of Forest Exploitation Entrepreneurs

- The National Trade Union of Young Forests Exploitation Entrepreneurs

- Several common initiative groups (CIG), Associations and non-governmental organisations (NGO).

A sub-regional level:

- The COMIFAC zone

- At international Level (Technical and/or financial): CAID, CACS, FDA, DFID, the World Bank, SNV, GTZ…

 

OUR ASSETS AS REGARDS THE FESP

“Making the FESP a better programme for great opportunities”

 

COMPONENT II:

- Approval of management plans; 

- Signing of decrees relating to the gazetting of FMUs;

- Gazetting of FMUs;

- Proposal for the definition of a legality scheme;

- Finalisation of the survey relating to the tracking of timber products;

- Launching of work activities relating to the 2nd generation of the SIGIF Initiative;

- Continuous and constant monitoring/checking of forest related activities;

- Improvement of litigation follow-up activities;

- Animation and coordination of the consultation mechanisms/frameworks;

- Negotiations of the EPAs and VPA with the European Union

 

EVOLUTION OF COMPONENT III

- Assessment of the efficiency of the eight (08) target TOUs;

- Finalization of the Manual of Procedures relating to the management of community hunting areas;

- Organization of several crack-down operations in Protected Areas, and in FMUs

- Reinforcement of the human resources in charge of ensuring the protection of Protected Areas (more than 80% of the staff recruited in 2008 were assigned to/posted in the Protected Areas).

 

EVOLUTION OF COMPONENT IV:

- More than 40 (Community forests) Simple management plans approved;

- 14 communities equipped with tools for exploitation;

- 15 training sessions organized for NGOs and well structured Communities;

- National Reforestation Programme effectively launched, and Studies on fuel wood finalized in the Northern Provinces, alongside the creation of Strategic Support Units;

 

EVOLUTION OF COMPONENT V 

- Structural studies for capacity building in the use of the SIGICOF, SICAF, SIGIPES, GLIN software carried out, as well as for the mastery of a number of management tools and systems (property, incentives for the staff, communication)

- Organization of adequate training sessions (computer skills, control strategies, military training, management related to result achievement).

- Recruitment of technical staff (Graduate Foresters as well as Forestry and Wildlife Technicians) and support staff;  

 

PROTECTED AREAS 

The current Protected Areas Network in Cameroon extends over a surface area of 8,138 800 hectares, representing some 18% of the national territory’s surface area.

These Protected Areas are grouped into several categories, and consist of:

- 15 existent National Parks, and others under creation;

- 06 Wildlife Reserves and others under creation;

- 02 Wildlife Sanctuaries and others under creation;

- 03 Zoological Gardens;

- 46 Cynegetic Hunting Zones (CHZ) meant for leasing; and

- 22 Community-Managed Cynegetic Hunting Zones (CMCHZ).

 

Come Let Us Serve You At The Ministry Of Forestry And Wildlife

PROCEDURES FOR OBTAINING ANY DEED, AUTHORISATION OR EXPLOITATION PERMITS IN OUR VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS

 

IN THE DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY

 

PERMIT FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS

(1 original and 9 certified authentic/true copies)

a) A duly stamped application stating the full names and residence of the applicant (if a natural person), the name and Articles of Association, Head Office, registered capital, and its distribution  as well as the name of the Director (in case of a corporate body);

b) A certified true copy of the act of approval;

c) Proof of available financial resources;

d) Investments foreseen (available transport and processing facilities to ensure the proper preservation of produce, existing or planned warehouse, provision taken or existing for local processing of all, or part, of the output);

e) A tax certificate;

f) A technical form established by the local official of Forestry Services, specifying the specie to be exploited, the quantity of produce intended for harvesting, as well as the place and condition of harvesting;

g) Where necessary, the certificates of verification and attestation of payment, of forestry taxes due on any exploitation act previously acquired;

h) A receipt proving payment of the files fees, the amount of which shall be determined in accordance with the law governing the financial system of the State;

i) An attestation of payment of National Social Insurance Fund contributions.

N.B: Application files shall comprise the documents listed above, as per Article 87 (1) of Decree N95/531/PM dated 23 August 1995, to determine the conditions of implementation of the forestry regulations.

 

APPLYING FOR AN APPROVAL TO EXERCISE FOREST EXPLOITATION ACTIVITIES

NATURE OF THE APPROVAL

- Forest inventories

- Sylvoculture

- Exploitation

 

FOR NATURAL PERSONS:

- A duly stamped application stating the full name, first names, nationality, profession and residence of the applicant respectively;

- A curriculum vitae stating the professional experience;

- A documentary evidence of the applicant’s technical skills, and professional experience;

- An extract of the applicant’s police record, less than three (3) months old;

- The statistical trade and registration numbers (Taxpayer’s);

- The field of intervention solicited;

- A tax certificate;

- A statement of tax situation;

- A receipt proving payment of the sum of 150 000 CFA francs representing file processing fees;

- The company’s financial and economic assets;

- Feasibility studies.

N.B.: The applicant should be resident in Cameroon

 

FOR CORPORATE BODIES

- A duly stamped application stating the full names and address of the company;

- A copy of the Articles of Association of the company;

- The statistical trade and registration numbers (Taxpayer’s Card);

- An extract of the applicant’s police record, less than three (3) months old;

- A curriculum vitae of the manager or the person in charge of conducting forest-related operations, and stating the technical skills of the latter;

- Present and past activities undertaken by the company;

- The field of intervention solicited;

- An attestation of payment of National Social Insurance Fund contributions.

- A tax certificate;

- A statement of tax situation;

- A receipt proving payment of the sum of 150 000 CFA francs representing file processing fees;

- The company’s financial and economic assets;

- Feasibility studies.

N.B.: The Company should be based in Cameroon.

 

AT THE DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE AND PROTECTED AREAS

 

WILDLIFE EXPLOITATION PERMITS

Any natural person or corporate body wishing to carry out a wildlife activity shall be granted approval in one of the following fields:

- Wildlife inventory;

- Wild life exploitation in the capacity, hunting guide or capturer;

- Exploitation of Protected Areas as a hunting guide;

- Management of Protected Areas and hunting zones.

The approval referred to in this Article shall be personal. It shall not be transferable.

The approval of one of the activities referred to in Article 32 shall be granted by Order of the Minister in charge of Wildlife, upon recommendation of a technical advisory board, and based on a file comprising:

 

FOR NATURAL PERSONS: 

- A duly stamped application

- An extract of the applicant’s police record, less than three (3) months old;

- An information sheet;

- Two passport-size photographs.

 

FOR CORPORATE BODIES

- A duly stamped application stating the full names and address of the company;

- A copy of the Articles of the Association;

- An extract of the police record of the manager of the company, less than three (3) months old;

- Current or past activities of the Manager of the company;

- Two passport-size photographs.

 

IN BOTH CASES

-  A copy of the business licence;

- Documents showing proof of professional experience and knowledge in the field requested;

- An authorization to buy and carry fire arms, and if necessary a tranquilizer gun;

- A list of the resources to be used;

- A receipt proving payment of the fees for the licence, and stamp duties, the amount of which shall be determined by the financial law.

- A receipt proving payment into the public treasury of file processing fees, the amount of which shall be determined in accordance with the financial law.

 

HUNTING LICENCE

- A duly stamped application;

- A duly stamped information sheet containing a statement to the effect that the applicant is aware of the hunting laws and regulations in force and undertakes to comply therewith;

- A certified true copy of the permit(s) to carry arms;

- A receipt proving payment of the arms tax;

- Two passport-size photographs

- A certified true copy of the national identity card or a residence permit for the residents;

- A medical certificate showing the applicant’s physical and mental fitness;

- A receipt proving payment of taxes due for the previous financial year, in the even of the renewal of the licence;

- A receipt proving payment of the fees of the licence, and stamp duties, the amount of which shall be determined by the financial law.

 

LICENCE TO CAPTURE WILD ANIMALS FOR SCIENTIFIC, COMMERCIAL, BREEDING OR DETENTION PURPOSES.

- A duly stamped application;

- A copy of the approval as a capturer of wild animals;

- A certified true copy of the hunting licence corresponding to the animal species to be captured;

- A receipt proving payment of the licence fees, the amount of which shall be determined by the financial law;

- A business licence

- A list of appropriate equipment, which shall be checked by the official in charge of the Provincial Wildlife Service;

- A land ownership certificate or lease of appropriate land for the future zoo.

 

LICENCE TO CAPTURE WILD ANIMALS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES OF EXPLORING WILDLIFE 

- A duly stamped application specifying the animal species to be captured;

- A certified true copy of the research permit issued by the competent Ministry;

- Taxes on the licence to hunt and capture specified species of wild animals;

- Two passport-size photographs.

- A curriculum vitae;

- A list of the resources to be used for capture;

- A receipt proving payment of the fees for the licence, and stamp duties, the amount of which shall be determined by the financial law.

 

COLLECTION LICENCE

- licence to collect game trophies for commercial purposes

- Licence to collect wild game carcases for commercial purposes

- Licence to possess crafted ivory

The collection licence for trophies of categories B and C game or the collection licence for the carcases of classes B and C game used for commercial purposes or otherwise, or the collection licence to possess crafted ivory for commercial purposes shall be issued by the Minister in charge of Forestry and Wildlife, upon the submission of a complete file comprising the following documents:

- A duly stamped application;

- A statement by the applicant, on his honour, and to the effect that he is aware of the hunting laws and regulations in force and undertakes to observe them;

- Two passport-size photographs.

- A certified true copy of the national identity card or a residence permit for foreigners;

- An extract of the applicant’s police record, less than three (3) months old.

2) The signing of the licence shall be subjected to the payment of:

- Fees for the licence concerned, amounting to the sum of 100 000 francs CFA francs per quarter (refer to the financial law);

- Allocation fees amounting to 10 000 CFA francs;

- Stamp fees amounting to the sum of 20 000 CFA francs.

NB: Collection licence shall be personal and non-transferable documents. No persons shall possess more than one collection licence.

Holders of collection licences shall freely dispose of their products throughout the national territory.

 

GAME-RANCHING OR GAME-FARMING LICENCES       

The exploration of a Game-ranch or Game-farming is subject to the obtention of a licence issued to the applicant by the Minister in charge of Wildlife, upon submission of a complete file comprising the documents hereafter;

- A duly stamped application;

- A localization plan;

- A curriculum vitae;

- An extract of the applicant’s police record, less than three (3) months old;

- A certified true copy of the national identity card or a residence permit for foreigners;

- A list of the applicant’s resources;

- Two passport-size photographs;

- A copy of the land ownership certificate or lease of appropriate land.

 

CINEMA, CYNEGETIC AND PHOTOGRAPHIC HUNTING PERMITS AND LICENCES 

Without prejudice to the separate provision concerning cinema camera and photographic filming, any person wishing to film or photograph wildlife scenes shall be required to obtain a cinema camera or photographic hunting licence issued under the conditions laid down by order of the Minister in charge of Wildlife.

In any case, the applicant shall specify the purpose for which the pictures are taken, as well as the references and types of apparatus used.

The issuing of a cinema camera and a photographic hunting licence shall be subject to the payment of a fee, the amount of which shall be fixed by the finance law.

 

AT THE DEPARTMENT OF PROMOTION AND PROCESSING OF FOREST PRODUCTS (DPT)  

 

ATTESTATION OF OWNERSHIP OF TIMBER PROCESSING EQUIPMENT (AOTPE)

- A report on the visit to the site, issued by either the Regional Delegation or the Divisional Delegate

- Legal documents attesting to ownership of appropriate processing equipment (purchase invoices, lease contracts or comparative reports produced by an expert approved by ONECA)

- A visit to the site, where necessary, and in the event of any doubt;

- Administrative documents (business licence, statistical trade registration numbers, taxpayer’s card, non indebtedness attestation or quitus).

- Articles of Association of the Company

 

CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION AS A WOOD PROCESSOR (CRWP)

- A duly stamped application addressed to MINFOF;

- Support documents justifying the source of supply of the wood or contracts duly signed by a bailiff, and approved by MINFOF;

- Support documents relating to means needed to carry out timber processing activities (attestation of ownership of appropriate processing equipment issued by DPT);

- Administrative documents (business licence, statistical trade registration numbers, taxpayer’s card, non indebtedness attestation or quitus).

- Articles of the Company

 

CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION AS A PROCESSED WOOD EXPORTER (CRPWE)

- A duly stamped application addressed to MINFOF;

- Photocopy of the CRPWE;

- Support documents justifying the source of supply of the wood or contracts duly signed by a bailiff, and approved by MINFOF;

- Support documents relating to means needed to carry out timber processing activities (attestation of ownership of appropriate processing equipment issued by DPT);

- Administrative documents (business licence, statistical trade registration numbers, taxpayer’s card, non indebtedness attestation or quitus).

- A Report on the activities carried out the previous financial year (where renewal is needed);

- A copy of the previous CRPWE (where renewal is needed).

 

CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION AS A LUGS EXPORTER (CRLE)

- A duly stamped application addressed to MINFOF;

- Support documents justifying the source of supply of the lugs;

- A copy of the licence;

- Administrative documents (business licence, statistical trade registration numbers, taxpayer’s card, non indebtedness attestation or quitus).

- A Report on the activities carried out the previous financial year (where renewal is needed);

- A copy of the previous CRPWE (where renewal is needed).

 

AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT TIMBER MADE ITEMS (AETMI)

- A duly stamped application addressed to MINFOF and specifying:

- The nature of the product;

- The origin of the product;

- The quantity (or number) of items;

- The destination.

 

AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT TIMBER (AET)

- A duly stamped application addressed to MINFOF;

- A delivery slip;

- Invoices attesting to the purchase of the processed wood constituting the slot concerned, and duly obtained from your regular supplier, who must be an industrialist formally registered at the level of MINFOF;

- Administrative documents (business licence, statistical trade registration numbers, taxpayer’s card, non indebtedness attestation or quitus).

 

Looking Ahead With Hope And Confidence In The Ministry Of Forestry And Wildlife

 

By Eric Kombey Wolete in Yaounde

 

Cameroon was seriously affected by the 2008/2009 world economic downturn, and like most third world countries, through no fault of hers. However, through the mature leadership of its Head of State President Paul Biya and the Yang Philemon government represented at the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife by the dynamic Prof. Elvis Ngole Ngole Cameroon was able to swim through the turbulent waters without much damage to the national economy.

 

With the very hard days hopefully over, it is time to look ahead. And to this end, Minister Ngole Ngole envisages appropriate measures and actions to ensure that government policy concerning the forestry and wildlife sectors is executed to the letter.

 

As Prof. Ngole Ngole told parliamentarians while defending his budget in the National Assembly on November 24, 2009: “In spite of the difficulties encountered by my ministerial department during the 2009 year and also thanks to new-found hope for the end of the international financial crises, the efforts started in 2009 would be maintained and new challenges are envisaged to continue with the putting into place of Cameroon’s forestry policy. That is why the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife envisages for 2010 a programme of ambitious but realisable activities with the support of all and especially the national representation on which we have always counted.”

 

The minister revealed that during the 2010 fiscal year, his ministry would undertake a number of important projects including the revision of the 1994 forestry law, the finalisation of the procedures of zoning of parts of the national territory not yet covered, the pursuit of the finalisation of Forestry Management Units and communal forest classification.

 

The management of production and communal forests would be continued as well as the pursuit of the putting in place of the decentralisation policy through the classification of communal forests, attribution of communal forests and the more active implication of the local populations and indigenes in the durable management of forests.

 

The government would also amongst other things:

-          put in place a timber tracing system in order to augment governance and transparency in the forestry sector;

-          the pursuit of the forest regeneration programme with particular accent being put on the regeneration of forest concessions and the follow-up on areas already regenerated under the terms of management conventions signed with local councils;

-          the intensification of forestry controls in all the forestry zones of the country;

-          the putting in place of the project for a green belt around big towns of the nation.

 

As concerns the promotion and transformation of wood, it is envisaged that in 2010 the ministry would carry out a study to identify the various trades involving wood and evaluate what is necessary to reinforce capacities, the training of artisans in the wood trade, the involvement and the participation of the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife in international promotion fairs etc.

 

In the wildlife sector, the ministry would continue with the process of creating protected areas begun in 2009. It would also among other things:

-          Acquire adequate materials to constitute a database;

-          Put in place management plans for key species (elephant, big monkeys, lions etc);

-          Elaborate, revise and put in place management plans for key species;

-          Put in place and harmonise the ecological follow-up process on wildlife and protected areas;

-          The effective implication of councils in the management of protected areas within the context of decentralisation;

-          The conclusion of the study on the management of man-wildlife conflicts and propose the relevant texts;

-          The pursuit of lessons on wildlife legislation in certain professional schools such as the military academy, police academy, gendarmerie academy and ENAM;

-          The increase of manpower in protected areas;

-          Finalising the elaboration or revision of management plans for national parks started in 2009; The formalisation of the platform for collaboration between the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife and the Ministry of Tourism for the development of ecotourism;

-          The technical and financial support of some pilot initiatives in game farming in collaboration with the Ministry of Animal Breeding, Fisheries and Industries;

-          The arrangement of exchange visits on the feasibility of game farming initiatives and alternatives to poaching;

-          The launching of studies on the enrichment and the re-population of protected areas with endangered wild animals.

 

All these lofty projections would come to naught if all the various stakeholders in the forestry and wildlife sectors do not put their hands together and work towards their realisation.

 

As the Minister of Forestry and Wildlife Prof. Elvis Ngole Ngole said in a recent letter to Cameroonians published on the website of that ministry: “I call thus call upon you to locally carry out this combat which gains go beyond our national borders.”

 

OUR WORKING TEAM

In order to accomplish its missions, the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife has a working team comprising :

-          A Private Secretariat

-          Two (2) Technical Advisers

-          A General Inspectorate

-          A National Brigade to check all forestry and anti-poaching-related activities

-          A Central Administration

-          External Services

-          Attached Services

 

OUR REFERENCES

Head Office: Ministerial Building N2, Yaounde

Website: www.minfof-cm.org

 

CABINET OF THE MINISTER

Telephone: (0237) 22-22-94-83

Fax:            (0237) 22-22-94-89

 

GENERAL INSPECTORATE

Telephone: (0237) 22-22-94-86

Fax:            (0237) 22-22-94-84

 

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY

Telephone/Fax: (0237) 22-23-92-31

 

DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE AND PROTECTED AREAS

Telephone/Fax: (0237) 22-23-92-28

 

DEPARTMENT OF TIMBER PROMOTION AND PROCESSING

Telephone/Fax: (0237) 22-23-92-33

 

DEPARTMENT OF COOPERATION AND PROGRAMMING

Telephone/Fax: (0237) 22-23-22-44

WEEKLY POST: KEEPING YOU UP-TO-DATE